Radical collaboration & how it might just save our planet

Radical collaboration & how it might just save our planet

Today I had a bunch of meetings to go to so I figured I’d use my driving time productively and listen to the latest episode of The Spaceship Earth. It’s a phenomenal podcast by Dan Burgess - creative strategist, co-designer, nature connector & all round epic human being. I was lucky enough to work with Dan last year on an awesome event in SF called Ocean Hack, and he’s been a fellow Wavemaker at our events in Portugal - so listening to his podcast always feels like such a joy.

His interview today was with Will Skeaping, former creative strategist in the ad industry, who quit his job six months ago to work full time with Extinction Rebellion. He’s one of the four co-editors of This is not a drill - The XR Handbook.

Here's my take on climate shame

Here's my take on climate shame

I’m packing for a trip. Tomorrow morning I leave for a ten day work trip to the Caribbean. We’re running a pilot for the environmental education program I’ve been working on for the last year. It’s a project I have poured blood, sweat & tears into. Something that (I really hope) has the potential to make a dent - a way to engage kids in the environmental issues we’re facing with optimism & curiosity. I haven’t seen the finished print workbook yet - it’s being couriered to the airport tomorrow morning in London so I can grab them before I get on my next flight.

In praise of difficult women

In praise of difficult women

We might never fit in. We will always be the ones with cuts & bruises. Both literal & metaphorical. The ones with wet hair & sunburnt noses. The ones who couldn’t care less about the car, the house, the holidays. The ones who never wear make up & barely brush their hair. The ones who will say it how it is, even if it makes everyone uncomfortable. Who throw the rule book out the window whilst feeling a sense of absolute relief and pure terror at the same time.

Break the rules if you need to

Break the rules if you need to

I’ve got to admit it. I’ve never been good with rules.

I’ve never coped well with environments that have conditions of entry or specific guidelines that must be followed. I sucked at working for the government - I had a seemingly epic job (creating environmental awareness campaigns) but when it came down to it, I felt like I was being asked to jump through hoops for the sake of jumping through hoops. So much red tape. So many meetings. A dress code. Specific working hours that needed to be adhered to regardless as to whether or not you’d actually done the work or not.

It's ok to not love every minute of it

It's ok to not love every minute of it

And so here I am writing this after what I could only describe as a day of wrangling. When I say wrangling, what I mean is one of those days that makes you feel exhausted, where everything just feels a bit harder than it probably needs to, and when every task on your list suddenly feels heavier and more urgent than normal.

So it was perfect timing for an email to show up in my inbox from a designer whose words resonated with me so deeply :

You can love what you're doing and be so.fucking.over.it at the same time.

The importance of zooming out

The importance of zooming out

We just spent an hour and a half looking at all the work I'm doing from a fresh perspective. We realised how easily I get excited about stuff and how that excitement seems to generate more ideas which turns into this runaway train of rad work. Ha ha. Yes, it's rad, but please note, I also said 'runaway'.

And so, with the help of someone super smart (and who, importantly, is not currently a passenger on this runaway train), I've been able to step back and see the tweaks that need to happen. I'm able to realise what needs attention, and where strong foundations need to be built.

Curate your community

Curate your community

There's a quote from Eleanor Roosevelt that I love :

Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.

And for me, it's always a reminder of when I'm in the right room. Because the conversation is exciting. The kinds of conversations that go deep and ask big questions of you. The kinds of conversations that can go on for hours but feel like minutes. And most importantly, the kinds of conversations that inspire action.